False killer whales hunt down shark in Australian waters


By Mashable – You wouldn’t expect a shark, of all creatures, to get a taste of its own medicine.

It’s hard to tell from this bird’s eye view, but in an Alien vs. Predator-type scenario, it looks like a pod of false killer whales has hunted down a small shark off the coast of Cronulla, a suburb of Sydney, Australia.

Bruno Kataoka filmed the encounter with a drone: Four whales tracking down what looks to be a juvenile shark as it attempts to flee. Moments later, the game is up. One of the whales grabs onto its prey with its jaws, dragging it down to the deep depths of the ocean.

Kataoka couldn’t believe his luck at witnessing such an awe-inspiring, natural event. “It was exciting, it was a really exciting moment,” he told 7 News. “National Geographic guys [would be] waiting months to get such a thing, and we just happened to be there at the right moment, at the right time.”

The bit of footage is thrilling, with such an attack being a particularly rare sight. “Oh it’s amazing, that kind of footage is just so rare to catch,” marine biologist Georgina Wood told the television station.

false-killer-whale

“We generally see a lot of action from humpbacks here in Sydney, especially during these winter months, and they can get up to around 14 to 15 metres (45 to 49 feet) long,” she said.

The false killer whales in the footage were much smaller than humpbacks, Wood explained, appearing to measure around three to five metres (9 to 16 feet) long.

False killer whales are usually found in deep tropical and temperate waters, according the Department of Environment, with adult males growing up to six metres (19 feet) long, while females grow up to five metres (16 feet) long.

It’s all cold comfort for this little shark, unfortunately.

Source: Mashable

-Hymer

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